The temple of Ptah at Memphis in the Saite-Persian era: landscape, sanctuaries, people

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Coming up this Friday the 27th October a talk by Nenad Marković. His talk will focus on elite priestly families of Memphis during the late Saite and the beginning of the Persian era (570-486 BCE) and their interrelations. His research also includes prosopography of Lower Egypt during the Saite-Persian and Ptolemaic Periods (664–30 BCE), the religious and socio-political history of Saite-Persian, Ptolemaic, and Roman Egypt (664 BCE–395 CE), as well as high priests of Ptah (c. 2700 BCE–c. 232 CE), the cult of the divine Apis bull (c. 3100 BCE–362 CE), and royal and non-royal women of Saite-Persian Egypt.

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UAVs (drones) in Archaeology – Gai Jorayev

Many thanks to Gai Jorayev for giving the first ‘Off the Record’ seminar of the term in which he explored the use of UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles, ‘drones’) in Archaeology.

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Gai described the use of UAVs in a wide range of projects in the Institute, including the Ancient Merv Project and in Olduvai Gorge (Tanzania), as well as in Archaeology South-East projects, with stunning images, 3D models and aerial footage demonstrating the importance of this technology for mapping, photogrammetric recording and heritage management. The value of UAVs in public engagement, both when in use and in producing such compelling results, was also clear.

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Gai described how the development in recent years of not only the UAVs themselves but also camera technology and software have pushed forward what is now possible, and how this has also been enhanced by skills and experience built up by using a range of equipment, software and techniques in varied locations and through experimentation. He also discussed the issues of processing the large quantities of data produced, as well as working in challenging terrain.

Thanks again to Gai for discussing the opportunities and challenges of this fascinating and rapidly-developing field!

A reminder that next Wednesday, 18th October, Tommaso Mattioli (University of Barcelona) and Margarita Díaz-Andreu (ICREA and University of Barcelona) will be giving a seminar, 5-6pm in room 209:

Intangible landscapes: measuring the acoustics of rock art sites in the Central and Western Mediterranean

For some time researchers have pointed out that, in addition to the visual, other senses may explain the production and location of rock art in prehistoric landscapes. Among all the senses, an increasing attention is being paid to hearing, but measuring acoustics has proved to be a challenge. Rock art researchers usually work in remote, open-air environments in which the equipment usually employed by acoustical engineers and architects is not adequate. In this talk we will discuss how we were able to overcome this and other difficulties in the case of our examination of rock art landscapes in the Central and Western Mediterranean.

Off the Record – Intangible landscapes: measuring the acoustics of rock art sites in the Central and Western Mediterranean, 18th October

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We are very pleased to welcome Tommaso Mattioli (University of Barcelona) and Margarita Díaz-Andreu (ICREA and University of Barcelona) to give an ‘Off the Record’ World Archaeology Section seminar, on Wednesday 18th October, 5-6pm, in room 209. 

Intangible landscapes: measuring the acoustics of rock art sites in the Central and Western Mediterranean

Majella_6 T Mattioli

For some time researchers have pointed out that, in addition to the visual, other senses may explain the production and location of rock art in prehistoric landscapes. Among all the senses, an increasing attention is being paid to hearing, but measuring acoustics has proved to be a challenge. Rock art researchers usually work in remote, open-air environments in which the equipment usually employed by acoustical engineers and architects is not adequate. In this talk we will discuss how we were able to overcome this and other difficulties in the case of our examination of rock art landscapes in the Central and Western Mediterranean.

Find out more on the project website: http://www.archeoacustica.net/

Also, a reminder that this week, on Friday 13th October, 1-2pm, Gai Jorayev will be giving the first ‘Off the Record’ lunchtime seminar this term, on UAVs (drones) in Archaeology in room 209.

Section Newsletter #9 May

May 2016

Welcome to the May 2016 edition of the IOA World Archaeology Section Newsletter.


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‘Off the Record’ lunchtime seminars

Thank you to our recent Off the Record speakers, Dr Elizabeth Bloxam, Sirio Canós Donnay and Beatrijs De Groot.

Call for ‘Off the Record’ speakers for the autumn term

We are now looking for people from the IOA World Archaeology section interested in leading a short lunchtime discussion for Off the Record in the autumn term. In particular we would welcome talks from:

  • New PhD students who could present research from their masters degrees or current doctorates
  • Postdocs or visiting fellows
  • Existing members of staff.

The sessions are informal and there is no set format. Please email sarah.hoile.12@ucl.ac.uk if you are interested.


News & Announcements

Minutes from the summer term section meeting

You can access the minutes from this month’s section meeting by clicking the link below.

World Archaeology Section meeting summer term


World Archaeology Section Graduate Representatives

I have just joined Barney Harris as one of the section graduate representatives. Many thanks to Andy Brown for all his work in the role last year alongside Barney, starting the blog and the ‘Off the Record’ seminars.

Do get in touch if you have news to share on the blog/newsletter or ideas for a lunchtime seminar.

Hope to see you soon!  Sarah Hoile


Stonehenge experiment

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An archaeological experiment, organised by PhD student Barney Harris, took place on Monday 23rd May in Gordon Square. Moving a 1-tonne block across the square using a wooden sledge, ropes and willing volunteers from the IOA and beyond generated some interesting research data and received a great deal of press interest, including this video on the BBC News website: ‘How hard was it to build Stonehenge’.

The experiment took place as part of UCL’s Festival of Culture 2016 and offered opportunities for the public, UCL staff and students to get involved. Around 60 individuals took part in the stone pulling and managed to haul it a distance of around 65m around Gordon Square park. The story was picked up widely in the media and reported as far as India, the US and South Asia.


Section Research

Legarra Herrero, B. (2016). An Elite Infested Sea: Interaction and Change in Mediterranean Paradigms. In B. Molloy (Ed.), Of Odysseys and Oddities. Scales and modes of interaction between prehistoric Aegean societies and their neighbours (pp. 25-52). Oxford: Oxbow Books.

Lockyear, K. (2016). The Coin Hoards of the Roman Republic database: the history, the data and the potential. American Journal of Numismatics.    http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1472136/

Quirke, S. G. J. (2016). Who writes the literary in late Middle Kingdom Lahun?. In K. Ryholt, G. Barjamovic (Eds.), Problems of Canonicity and Identity Formation in Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia (pp. 127-152). Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press.


Conferences, events and forums

World Archaeology Festival

11th June 2016, UCL Institute of Archaeology

The IOA’s popular World Archaeology Festival will take place again this year, on Saturday 11th June from 12-5pm.  Part of the Council of British Archaeology’s Festival of Archaeology, there will be a range of activities and displays throughout the afternoon. For more details, see the World Archaeology Festival website.

Sicily: heritage of the world conference

24th and 25th June 2016, British Museum

This conference accompanies the current British Museum exhibition Sicily: culture and conquest. For further details, and to book, please see the British Museum website.

Workshop – Coins, hoards, and special deposits: current research

22nd June 2016, UCL Institute of Archaeology

Whether by intent or accident, the deposition of objects provides the bricks and mortar for an understanding of social, economic, and ritual behaviour in past societies. As the finds record continues to grow, attention has increasingly focused on three deposit classes: ‘single finds’, particularly coins, deemed accidentally lost, intentionally-deposited object hoards, and ‘special deposits’ representing a ritual act(s). Hosted at the Institute of Archaeology (UCL), this workshop seeks to advance an interdisciplinary and multi-period dialogue on objects and their deposition, highlighting the work of current doctoral and research projects at UK institutions.

Speakers include IOA PhD students Ethan Doyle White and Murray Andrews, with the keynote lecture by Kris Lockyear.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/workshop-coins-hoards-and-special-deposits-current-research-tickets-25262663306

African Rock Art: Research digital outputs and heritage management

4th-5th November 2016, British Museum

CALL FOR PAPERS

The African Rock Art Image Project at the British Museum will hold a conference in November. The deadline for the call for presentations and posters is 15th July.

https://africanrockartconference.com/

Archaeology International (AI 19)

A reminder that news items and research up-dates may be submitted until May / June.

http://www.ai-journal.com/


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